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June 19, 2019 – Free Speech & Peace

Scholars Pair Up with Their Philosophical Opposites to Research American Democracy

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Scholars Pair Up with Their Philosophical Opposites to Research American Democracy

In February, the University of Arizona-based National Institute for Civil Discourse (NICD) issued a request for proposals for scholars with different ideologies and from different disciplines who seek to come together to research core concepts and institutions that are vital to American political and civic life.

This month NICD awarded grants to 10 scholars for a total of five projects:

  • Joan McGregor and Tracy Fessenden (Arizona State University), “Recovering our Moral Capital”
  • Molly McGrath (Assumption College) and Robert Boatright (Clark University), “Corruption and Corruption Talk”
  • Diana Mutz and Ani Nenkova (University of Pennsylvania), “Identifying and Quantifying Uncivil Political Discourse in Audio-Visual Media”
  • Kate Kenski, Steve Bethard, Steve Rains, & Yotam Shmargad (University of Arizona), and Kevin Coe (University of Utah), “Detecting Incivility in 2020 Presidential Primary Candidate Social Media Posts”
  • Joshua Grubbs (Bowling Green State University), Sean Stevens (NYU), and colleagues, “Effects of Perceived Moral Grandstanding on Public Discourse”

Upon completion of the research in the fall of 2020, the scholars will present their findings as well as reflections on their collaboration.

Read more about the projects here, and read a recent NPR article highlighting NICD’s work here. For more details on the Charles Koch Foundation grant supporting NICD, click here.